Article by: Cameron Blake 

Marketing is about presenting your company’s message in repeated transmissions, without causing the buyer resentment. To achieve this, marketing must attract customers based on the values and principles that they have in common with the brand. When consumers can identify their values within a brand and constantly be reinforced by that very same value system, consumers tend to become loyal customers and passionate ambassadors – since it is ‘their’ value they are promoting. You need to have a sensitive and relatable personality in order to achieve this. So it is no shocker women are bringing a different outlook to the marketing world and in turn driving results faster than ever.

Here are three principles that women use which make them the most successful marketers.

Why-women-are-better-drivers

Confidence: As marketing professional, women are able to get their ideas across by using a soft and gentle approach while achieving the same objective, promoting the brand value. Collaborators: Women have a better ability to collaborate in business. They are team builders and can understand all perspectives. Women have one goal during a conflict and that is to facilitate some sort of compromise and happy-medium space. Communication: A trait most women carry is being a good listener, and it is something women value in a partnership as well whether that be personal or business related. Women tend to listen before they react in a situation and are better at picking up more body language and voice inflection cues. 

Why women are better drivers-02

 

In order to push through the complex nature of a maledominated corporate world, women in marketing must continue to break through personal and society’s constraints placed upon them.

By enforcing the support and progress of women toward executive-level positions, we will see the evolution of diverse leadership in the corporate world. 

The marketing world is certainly filled with relentless women who have made it to the top and reached success beyond boundaries.

Cont..

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“Made in Sri Lanka” 0 1167

Ever watch the movie, Rocky? I mean, any of those would suffice. But mainly, the original. In fact, if you know anything about Stallone’s life itself, you’ll know that he’s probably one of the biggest success stories in history. Now, there are plenty of famous people who failed but never gave up on their dreams. You can find them all throughout history. There sagas are powerful enough to make you second guess ever giving up in life.

Does the common idea of geniuses having an eccentric ideas and behaviors bear any truth? Here is a story of eccentric entrepreneur for you to decide.

People waste searching endlessly for magic, whereas to Lawrence Perera life itself is a magic. “I didn’t grow up around incredible cars or at a time where there was luxury. Few of my earliest and fondest memories involve automobiles. My story begins as kid who broke every toy car received just so that I could see how it was made. My mother noticed my passion for cars and decided that I should get into automobile engineering field and made me enter the German tech without waiting to go to the university, she was keen to see me making a career in the automobile industry’’ says Dr. Lawrence with a sense of gratitude, by starting his conversation with BiZnomics. “Just as we have moments in time crystallized by places, music or movies that imprint upon us, the automobile left an indelible impression on my experience and who I became”.

Now an Automobile Engineer by profession with over 40 years’ experience in the Automobile Engineering Industry both locally and overseas, Dr.Perera is a diploma holder in Automobile Engineering at the CGTTI, and Institute of Motor Industry of UK. He is also a certified automobile engineer in the Institute of Motor Industry and a fellow member of the Institute of Motor Industry – UK (FIMI).

‘’I know from very hard won experience that start-ups are enormously difficult and risky and chances are you might not succeed” says Dr. Lawrence Perera, Leading entrepreneur, Chairman and CEO of Micro Holdings and Micro Cars Ltd. Dr. Lawrence’s “ hard won experience’’ is based on manufacturing the car “Micro” the first designed , developed and manufactured car in Sri Lanka.

He has received extensive training with BMW, Volkswagen – Germany and Peugeot – France. Dr. Perera described his daily sightings of stranded people on the roads due to the chaotic situation of public transport and realized the crying need for a reliable alternative. ‘’I thought that if people had a reliable, economical, decent, comfortable and affordable car that would take them to the place they want to go, the problem would be solved and many man-hours would be saved. I then set to design and develop a small car with every household in mind – and that’s where MICRO started’’ he said.

Describing his product further he states: ‘’It was the tuk-tuk that influenced me to create a small car. The Morris Minor was the smallest at the time and the dimensions of my drawing were smaller. My product which was patented in 1999 was an 80% local manufacture. As far the brand name, I decided on micro mini and finally named it MICRO’’.

Dr. Lawrence Perera had been skeptical of the success of his product at the time it was launched at the price of LKR 300,000. ‘’ At that time local products were thought to be inferior but MICRO turned out to be acceptable and most bought it because it was economically priced’’. Marketing local brands had been very competitive as it was difficult to challenge and compete with international giants in the market.

The Micro was fitted with safety standards such as air bags and seat belts. Yet, Lawrence had to stop production mainly due to complicated manufacturing process and cost of production increasing.

The garment industry in Sri Lanka has made a big contribution to change people’s mentality in buying ‘made in Sri Lanka goods’. Garments sewn in Sri Lanka have earned in international reputation and Sri Lankan consumers are well aware of this fact. The government should encourage local products, and especially an industry such as automobile requires a certain tax relief for composite material used for making cars. Adding to this, He criticizes the industrial policy and taxation systems prevailing as not being friendly and conducive to local industrialist and manufactures. The Micro brand of which Sri Lanka could be proud of became well known the world over, even in countries such as Germany, China and Korea. But I could not develop Micro because support for the automobile industry is almost zero. For one thing vehicle importers were against local manufacture since their imports business would take a downward turn. And next, the industrial policy of the country and the taxation system does not provide any impetus at all. Although a normal car is not a luxury, but a necessity”. He claims that during the last four years, the company run with losses, and that the financing aspect has been terrible. The bank loan interest rate has shot up from 6.5% to 14.5%. p.a. “Business has been thrown into a quagmire”, he says and adds, “We have to pay much more than we earn”

Dr. Lawrence opines, that Sri Lanka has been in a miasma of uncertainty for a while, and that the combined effects of numerous policy changes have thrown many enterprises including the motor vehicle industry into turmoil, insists that the country should have strong decision-taking and unwavering leaders who will dispel personal gains and crack the whip to drive away corruption while instilling discipline in all sectors, in order that the country could emerge from one of its lowest phases in recent history with a record decline in business.

Dr. Lawrence Perera’s view is that gasoline engines will gradually go out of the market. He states that with the introduction of hybrid vehicles, gasoline engines changed, but that hybrids will survive only with combustion engines. ‘’whereas Japan went for the hybrid, China jumped into electric engines which will last for another 100 years. We should also adopt the electric car. With sunshine around all throughout the year, car solar batteries fitted to electric engines can be charged at no cost and what a saving on fuel that will be! Anyway, gasoline engines will gradually make its way out of the market, in not too distant future.

With the influx of hybrid and electronic cars an eco-environment challenge will be the lack of adequate provisions to dispose of used bittern such vehicles in the future. The lack of regulators for strict recycling and safe disposal of batteries will lead to them ending in garbage dumps. Another area that needs attention to curb pollution and improve and conserve of quantity is to adopt a long-term vision or polices of emission standards. The lack of the stable policy outlook may associate Sri Lanka with volatility and high risk.

Adding to his many innovative ‘firsts’, Dr. Lawrence Perera was the first to design an economical rail solution for the Sri Lanka Railway, in 2004, the first in Sri Lanka to assemble 4×4 SUVs under the technology transfer agreement with the Korean Ssang Yong motor company, with Mercedes technology in 2006, and the first to manufacture a luxury double decker bus with the latest technology complete with fully aluminium low floor monocaqne design for public transport in 2007. Commenting on his economical rail solution Dr. Perera says: “In 2004 I designed an economical rail solution termed ‘Lanka Econo Rail’ for mass transport to replace the car in the megapolis. My proposal was to build carriages using scrapped steel, with automatic doors, good seating and all comfort. My proposal envisaged buses at relevant stations to transport the passengers to their destination like the monorail or metro in foreign countries. It was a light-rail concept place of the heavy locomotive system which has been in operation for the past 164 years. However, this was blocked by railway officers who want the steel to be sold at dirt price by the kilo, as obsolete.

Dr.Perera attributes his success to his family – wife and two daughters who had been very supportive, without their support he wouldn’t have achieved so much. Dr.Perera is determined to showcase Sri Lanka’s potential in the international car industry.

By : T V Perera

Image Curtsey : Eranga Pilimatalawwe

Make timely moves to stay competitive 0 289

By Dr. Kishu Gomes
Prominent business leader, Corporate Icon & Management Consultant, Kishu
Gomes was the Chief of Sri Lanka Tourism (SLTDA & SLTPB) after leading a
multinational operation in Sri Lanka for over 2 decades. He continues to consult
businesses and corporates to take a transformational journey.

Many things cause organizational change. Covid19 is one big example only. Other than
pandemics or epidemics, economic downturns, tougher trading conditions, finance cost
escalation, technological changes, competitive pressures, including mergers and
acquisitions, customer pressure, particularly shifting markets, government legislation or
regulatory changes etc.
All organizations are in flux: changing their focuses, expanding or contracting their activities, and rethinking their products and services. Most organizations more than ten years old look nothing like they did even five years ago. Pre and post-COVID 19 are two different worlds altogether. And it is likely that in the next year or two organizations will not look as they do today.

In this context, managers have to be able to introduce and manage change to ensure
the organizational objectives of change are met, and they have to ensure that they gain
the commitment of their people, both during and after implementation. Often, at the
same time, they also have to ensure that business continues as usual.
Resistance to change may be active or passive, overt or covert, individual or organized,
aggressive or timid, and on occasions totally justified. Organizational change
management takes into consideration both the processes and tools that managers use
to make changes at an organizational level. Most organizations want change
implemented with the least resistance and with the most buy-in as possible. For
this to occur, change must be applied with a structured approach so that
transition from one type of behavior to another will be smooth.

As the speed of change continues to increase, change management is a fundamental competency needed by managers, supervisors, Human Resources staff, and organization leaders. To tap your wisdom, my recent survey about change management afforded me the opportunity to consolidate hundreds of years of experience in change management. Here, in your… Change is possible; the need for change is increasing; change capability is necessary for organizations that will succeed in the future. Change management challenges organizations to succeed during times of great change. Employees love to stay in their comfort zone because it is familiar and they know what their expectations are. Many employees fear change and the manager has the responsibility to help employees move through the change process. Managers need to develop themselves as a role model for change and create an environment where all of their employees will get aboard and be willing to make the changes that are needed. It takes a smart and intuitive manager to manage change in any business organization. In order for a manager to effectively manage change in the business setting, they need to develop an understanding of how employees react to change. Every employee will have a different view of change and what their reaction to change will be. It is important that the manager stays visible and is always willing to jump in and help the employees manage change. In order to be an effective manager of change, the employees must continue to feel valued and respected by their manager. If a manager helps the employees through the process of learning to let go of the old way of doing things, they can help the employee adjust to the new changes in their working environment.

Deal with resistance
When a manager is facilitating change in the business world, they need to be
aware and acknowledge that resistance to change is normal and common.

Smart managers will recognize that resistance to change can actually be viewed as a positive sign that the employees are involved with the changes that are occurring in their working environment. If employees do not believe in their managers and lack trust in their decisions or there have been explanations of the reasons for change and how it will benefit the employees, that manager will have difficulty managing any changes that need to be implemented.
Another effective tool for a manager to use to implement change in the business setting
is to involve the employees in the decisions that are being made to change their working
environment. This is a method to help the employees feel valued and more motivated
to go along with the implementation of the changes. This becomes a win-win situation
for the organization, the manager, and all of the employees. Managers that involve their
employees and let them become part of the change will have an easier road for
acceptance from the employees.

Communication is the manager’s best friend. This is how the manager prepares the employees for the changes and can clearly clarify the expectations and expected outcomes. The manager is the individual that clearly can communicate the rationale for the change and answer the employee’s questions and stress the importance for the change to occur. Managers need to remain positive and upbeat and show the employees they are energized to make the changes happen. There are always some risks when changes are being initiated. The manager needs to be ready for the potential negative effects of any changes and have a plan to handle them. If mistakes occur along the way, then this is the opportunity for the manager and their employees to learn from the mistakes and move forward. Organizations that have a talented and effective manager will be able to handle the changes that need to occur to keep them competitive in their industry.