Traffic-Jams-in-Sri-Lanka

BY T.V. PERERA

At the turn of the century, chaos and anarchy ruled the streets of Colombo, and that was not because city traffic was a mess then as it is now. Everyone will agree that traffic in Colombo has worsened in recent times; slow moving on all main trunk roads into the city not only during rush hours but also at normal times, and getting worse in the heart of Colombo. If Colombo is to accommodate the growing number of vehicles on its roads, the road network would have to be increased by three-fold in the not too distant future.

Colloquially known as traffic jams or traffic snarlups, traffic congestion is a transport condition characterized by slow speeds, longer trip times and increased vehicular queueing. When traffic is great, interaction between vehicles slows the speed of the traffic stream which results in congestion. Likewise, as demand approaches the capacity of a
road or its intersections, extreme congestion sets in. Traffic congestion also occurs when a column of traffic generates demand for space greater than that available, when vehicles are fully stopped for periods of time and also due to incidents such as a crash or roadworks which may reduce road capacity below normal levels.
According to the Time magazine, Sao Paulo in Brazil has the world’s worst daily traffic jam with over 300 kms of cummulative queues around the city during the evening rush hours. Last year, Mumbai was the worst city for traffic chaos where drivers can expect to spend an average 65% extra time stuck in a gridlock.

TRAFFIC-JAMS--BiZnomics   vc

Individual incidents such as accidents or even a single car braking heavily could cause congestion, yet traffic research still cannot fully predict under which conditions a traffic jam as opposed to heavy but smoothly flowing traffic may suddenly occur. Of the over 4.4 million vehicles registered, around 2.7 million are on the roads causing the Colombo roads to be full with traffic congestion as an average 250,000 vehicles made up of 15,000 buses, 10,000 trucks and 225,000 private vehicles enter the city daily.

A man-made menace, traffic congestion has a number of negative effects such as being detrimental to the development of a country, killing productivity, and is a national waste. Not only does productivity and the sense of well-being go astray, it also leaves people angry, exhausted and depressed. To get stuck in a traffic jam of stress is really frustrating. Vehicle numbers increasing without any plan to expand road conditions and manage road discipline, is plainly visible.

The increasing vehicles contribute to long lines on the road yet no one seems to be interested in taking any positive and effective action other than the police which is responsible for controlling this mess. Successive governments have indicated intentions of taking corrective measures but nothing has been done to control road traffic which besides being annoying, is costing us billions of rupees and a massive financial and manhour loss as a result of no vehicular control in the Greater Colombo areas. Statistics reveal that there are 130 vehicles per 1000 people out of which 66% are motor cycles while three-wheelers and cars make up 45 vehicles per 1000 people. Very soon the number of vehicles on the road could grow to 5 million and there will be 250 vehicles per every 1000 persons which may concentrate around the city. This is contrary to the country’s needs of fewer vehicles carrying more people.

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Nature’s Beauty Secret 0 463

Nature's Secret Factory

Nature’s Beauty Creations Ltd is a fully Sri Lankan owned company and the most awarded cosmetics manufacturer in Sri Lanka. Its brands include Nature’s Secrets, Panda Baby, Chandi Panda, Champion, Misumi, elithé and several others.

Ms-Shamindi-Kumarasinghe
Ms. Shamindi Kumarasinghe Head of Exports, Nature’s Beauty Creations (Pvt) Ltd.

The company’s advanced manufacturing complex exceeds European recognized GMP quality requirements and is accredited with international ISO standards. It is also the only cosmetics company to be awarded Sri Lanka’s highest environmental award, The National Green Award – Gold, and Sri Lanka’s highest employee wellbeing award, the Sri Lanka Corporate Health & Productivity Awards – Gold (large category). Around its manufacturing complex, the company also grows and maintains Sri Lanka’s largest privately owned collection of medicinal plants (over 800 varieties) for conservation and research.

Since its inception, the company has been fiercely passionate about quality, environmental conservation, consumer and employee wellbeing, and community empowerment, embarking on a sustainable journey to create responsible beauty that is natural, safe and ethical, both within its shores and beyond.  Today we are proud to have grown into one of Sri Lanka’s leading cosmetics exporters.

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Circular Economies: Is Sri Lanka’s Waste Crisis a Wasted Opportunity 0 133

Circular-Economies-Is-Sri-Lanka’s-Waste-Crisis-a-Wasted-Opportunity-1

 

Sri Lanka is currently in the midst of a waste crisis with landfills running out of space and the costs of disposal spiralling rapidly. A recent report by the WWF named Sri Lanka as the fifth largest contributor to marine plastic pollution and the level of recycling in Sri Lanka in particular for plastics falls well below global averages.

Circular-Economies-Is-Sri-Lanka’s-Waste-Crisis-a-Wasted-Opportunity-2

 

The Sri Lankan economy on the other hand, continues to suffer from a significant balance of trade deficit and a weakening rupee in part due to imports for raw materials such as plastics, aluminium, paper/cardboard and electronics. Finding a way to increase the domestic ability to sort and recycle these materials for re-use in a circular way may in fact provide a solution for both the environment and the economy.

Circular-Economies-Is-Sri-Lanka’s-Waste-Crisis-a-Wasted-Opportunity

 

A linear economy, which typifies most products and materials here in Sri Lanka, is one whereby products are manufactured, used and then disposed of as waste. A circular economy by contrast, is one that aims to eliminate waste through the continual use of resources by reusing, repairing, refurbishing, remanufacturing and recycling raw materials and products at the end of their usable lives. This therefore closes the loop on the manufacturing process thereby reducing the need for new materials.

 

Circular-Economies-Is-Sri-Lanka’s-Waste-Crisis-a-Wasted-Opportunity-2

The waste problem is not just limited to the Sri Lankan economy as materials such as plastics do not biodegrade and therefore will continue to exist until a solution is found. Plastic breaks down into what is known as microplastics after some time which significantly harms the environment as animals ingest this and toxins from the material itself seep into the water table. Recent studies suggest that we are ingesting the equivalent of one credit card every week. The health impacts of the plastic epidemic are likely to grow significantly.

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