The Sun Festival – A tradition that brings past to the Nation… Comments Off on The Sun Festival – A tradition that brings past to the Nation… 982

Sun Festival“A year has departed
A new has started
All have awaited
For a festival elated
Mistakes are corrected
Good deeds are committed
The crops are harvested
For a tradition that brings a Nation together!”

‘Aluth Avurudda’ one of the biggest celebrations in Sri Lanka starts on 13th of April and ends in 14th of April that features lots of rituals and customs is one of the must things to experience.

Based on the movement of the sun from Meena Rashiya (House of Pisces) to the Mesha Rashiya (House of Aries) marks the end of the harvest season, Sri Lankans welcome the New Year in April with lots of rituals, fireworks and gourmet of traditional sweets.

The Sun festival or the Sinhala and Tamil New Year is a ritual performed to honor the Sun God for hundreds and hundreds of years, comes with a long history that is not experienced anywhere else.

The unique rituals and the traditions are what make the New Year special.

Neutral Period (Nonagathaya)

The New Year ritual starts from the neutral period where people keep off from all work and engage in religious activities to get the blessings to prepare for the New Year.

Lighting the hearth (Lipa gini melaweema)

With the dawn of the New Year comes the first ritual, the lighting of the hearth of the house to prepare milk rice to symbolize the prosperity.

First meal at the New Year table (Ahara anubawaya)

Food plays a major role in the New Year celebration at each house. A table with kiribath (milk rice), bananas, kevum, kokis, aggala, aasmi, aluwa, welithalapa, and many other traditional sweets become the centerpiece of any table. Every family that celebrates New Year enjoys the festival at the auspicious time after lighting an oil lamp.

Starting work and exchanging money (Weda alleema saha ganu denu)

Once the family finishes the New Year meal, they engage in some work to symbolize starting their work for the New Year. Next they perform a transaction among the family members and other respected parties. This also done with the well to thank it for the clear water provided the past year.

Sun Festival

Anointing oil (Hisa thel gaama)

Oil prepared according to a special mixture of herbs are anointed on people’s heads to bless them with health and healing. This ritual is usually done by a religious leader, a family head or an elder superior in the village.

New Year sweets.

You cannot speak about the Sinhala and Tamil New Year without having to talk about food. These are some of the sweets prepared at almost all households during this time and shared amongst the families and friends to extend friendship or to forget any mishap during the past year.

Konda kewum – Made with coconut trickle and rice flour and deep fried.

Aasmi – A crunchy traditional sweet topped with traditional caramel syrup.

Kokis – Fried, crispy sweet made from rice flour and coconut milk.

Mung kewum – A diamond shaped sweet with a crunchy crust and a sweet paste of green gram inside.

Avurudu music and games

This is a season that’s focused on family. During this time people return home to celebrate the festival with the rest of the family. Fun games and activities play an important part at this time.

Playing the rabana (A large drum people sit around and play)
Traditional board games (Olinda keliya, Pancha demima)
Kotta pora (Pillow fight)
Kanamutti bindeema (Breaking the pots)
Kamba adeema (tug-war)
Banis keema (Eating buns)
Lissana gaha (Climbing the greasy pole)

April is perhaps one of the best months in Sri Lanka due to the Sinhala and Tamil New Year festival which cannot be seen anywhere else.

A woman whose light doesn’t have an off switch! In conversation with – Ashanthi Soris Mirchandani 0 1510

When saying TRX what we’re really talking about is a training method called ‘suspension training’. This has started in 1997 when an old Navy SEAL, Randy Hetrick developed a method that allowed for exercising during deployment.

TRX training is about using body weight exercises to develop strength, balance, flexibility and core stability simultaneously. It requires the use of the TRX suspension trainer, a performance training tool that leverages gravity and the user’s body weight to complete the exercises.

What you should know about the workout itself is that TRX is also a form of functional training. And why we like functional training is because the benefits go well beyond your fitness studio. With functional training you don’t just burn fat and build muscles, you also increase your core strength, power and mobility which are needed for virtually every movement of life.

If it’s all about the numbers and/or aim to lose weight, then we have got some good news. A single session of 60-min TRX training at high intensity burns approximately 400 calories. Which is indeed more than what you can expect to burn with all the fancy boutique cycling classes.

And, there’s more to it, we have just the person you can turn to who is also a professional TRX trainer in Sri Lanka.

Q & A

BiZnomics: How did you come up with the idea to start up the breakthrough Studio?

Answer: I have always been a fitness enthusiast. Fitness has been a passion, a hobby, and something I incorporated in my daily routine. I started my fitness journey as a personal trainer a year and a half before I started the Breakthrough Studio. Personal training became tough, I had to commute from Battaramulla where I was residing at the time, to meet about 6 clients a day whom I trained in Colombo. I didn’t see a future in it for me to grow in that area. I wanted to build a brand in fitness using TRX and create a business out of it. Having a little studio meant that I could do just that. And at the same time I could serve more people.

BiZnomics: What qualifications made you the best person for this?

Answer: The biggest qualification I say I have is the love and passion for fitness and TRX. Passion is the biggest qualification you need for anything in life. Other than that I am certified in TRX suspension training, TRX Rip training, and Pre and post-natal training. I also hold a BSc in Food Science and Technology from the University of Victoria, Australia.

BiZnomics: Do you follow a certain morning routine or daily schedule to maximize productivity and well-being?

Answer:I never had time to follow a morning routine, with work. I used to get only 6 hours of sleep on most days, and I love my sleep so, I never had a morning routine as such. My daily routine includes a one hour workout in between work, and on most days quiet time in prayer, and reading the Bible. Also listening to teachings of Prophet Kirby.

BiZnomics: What is the biggest challenge for you as an entrepreneur?

Answer: At the beginning of my career as a coach and an entrepreneur, I used to take 7 classes a day, and that I did for about a year and a half. It was a lot of work although at that time it didn’t feel like that. I couldn’t take time off, I couldn’t cancel classes, I knew that my clients were coming with enthusiasm and they had goals and were eager to achieve them. Therefore there was no time in between. I couldn’t find trainers who were passionate about what they did and who would be a part of the studio, until a few months ago. Now it’s a team of three who trains from 6am to 8pm at the studio. Finding individuals who love their job, the people with a passion to serve as you would to your clients who were also committed to what they do, was a challenge and I think it’s a challenge in any business.

BiZnomics: What did you do before starting up the studio?

Answer: I worked as a Senior Secretary to the CEO at Dialog Telecom. Thereafter for my dad, in our family owned business after which I turned into fitness and worked as a personal trainer.

BiZnomics: What is the most difficult thing about what you do?

Answer: Honestly NOTHING!!! This has been the easiest thing I have done ever, and I have the most amount of fun while at work too!!! I love meeting people from all walks of life, I love being able to have a positive impact on their life. Most of my clients have never worked out before, so it’s interesting for me to watch them enjoying a healthier lifestyle. It’s crazy but no, it’s not difficult at all, and I think that’s because I love what I do, and I have a knowing kind of an assurance that GOD has my back. There is ZERO anxiety and stress, when you realize who you are in God. It has never been difficult, even when I was doing 7 classes a day 5 days a week, it wasn’t impossible, I didn’t hate it, I loved it.

BiZnomics: What type of a person do you think should be an entrepreneur?

Answer: Anyone can if they have the right heart, attitude, passion, determination and the will to do it. BUT one must want it.

BiZnomics: What mantra do you live by?

Answer: I have a few;
See the Goodness of God in Every Situation whether it’s Good or Bad!
No matter how bleak the situation is God’s got my back;
There is blessing in the delay;
Always keep your conscience clean;
I am loved no matter what;

It is what – it is just – do it and get on with it!
It’s a mantra I use when I have to get stuff done and I am whining to myself at times, says Ashanthi laughingly.

Answer: I love being a couch potato and watching Netflix with Haren in my free time.

BiZnomics: What do you do to be motivated?

Answer: Spending time in prayer keeps me motivated. Praying in tongues keeps me energized and motivated. It floods me with ideas and creativity. Motivation to me is supernatural. It’s like a gift that fell on me suddenly and it doesn’t cease. I haven’t done anything to keep developing it as such and that’s why it is not normal. There is a sense of excitement and enthusiasm when I think about the studio. It has always been there since I started the studio two years ago.

BiZnomics: Do you think women feel intimidated in business?

Answer: There is no reason why they should, if it is so. It has nothing to do with another person or the business. They have allowed themselves to become victimized by someone else’s action or by somebody. They need to deal with it if they feel that way.

BiZnomics: What have you learned about mentoring others?

Answer: Still learning! Allow them to make mistakes and let them learn at their own pace, but push them to be good learners than fast learners.

Don’t mentor someone unless they want to be mentored, you need a willing heart;
Be approachable;
Listen to their point of view;
Admit your mistakes;
Accept that everyone is different;
Don’t judge anyone;
Allow them to grow, and trust their growth;
Teach them responsibility at work.

BiZnomics: Is this your childhood dream?

Answer: YES, it indeed has been a childhood dream to own a business that I built myself, to start small and make it grow, to be a successful entrepreneur, to do something that would have a positive impact on society. To be where I am, I feel blessed.

BiZnomics: Where do you find courage, confidence and motivation?

Answer: In having a relationship with GOD and learning about him through his word, knowing how much I am loved, and knowing my identity in HIM. The secret of ‘success’ in every area of your life is in the ‘WORD’. That’s why I love the teachings of Wow Life Church. That’s what I am and what I want to become!

By : Savanna Audrey

The Most Important Question of Your Life 0 1360

By : Chantal D

Everybody wants what feels good. Everyone wants to live a carefree, happy and easy life, to fall in love and have amazing sex and relationships, to look perfect and make money and be popular and well-respected and admired and a total baller to the point that people part like the Red Sea when you walk into the room.

Everyone would like that — it’s easy to like that.

If I ask you, “What do you want out of life?” and you say something like, “I want to be happy and have a great family and a job I like,” it’s so ubiquitous that it doesn’t even mean anything.

 

How-to-get-hapiness-in-love-life

A more interesting question, a question that perhaps you’ve never considered before, is “what pain do you want in your life?” “What are you willing to struggle for”? Because that seems to be a greater determinant of how our lives turn out.

Everybody wants to have an amazing job and financial independence — but not everyone wants to suffer through 60-hour work weeks, long commutes, obnoxious paperwork, to navigate arbitrary corporate hierarchies and the blasé boundaries of an endless cubicle hell. People want to be rich without the risk, without the sacrifice, without the delayed gratification necessary to accumulate wealth.

Everybody wants to have great sex and an awesome relationship — but not everyone is willing to go through the tough conversations, the awkward silences, the hurt feelings and the emotional psychodrama to get there. So they settle. They settle and wonder “What if?” for years and years until the question morphs from “What if?” into “Was that it?” And when the lawyers go home and the alimony check is in the mail they say, “What was that for?” if not for their lowered standards and expectations 20 years prior, then what for?

Because happiness requires struggle. The positive is the side effect of handling the negative. You can only avoid negative experiences for so long before they come roaring back to life.

At the core of all human behavior, our needs are more or less similar. Positive experience is easy to handle. Its negative experience that we all, by definition, struggle with. Therefore, what we get out of life is not determined by the good feelings we desire but by what bad feelings we’re willing and able to sustain to get us to those good feelings.

People want an amazing physique. But you don’t end up with one unless you legitimately appreciate the pain and physical stress that comes with living inside a gym for hour upon hour, unless you love calculating and calibrating the food you eat, planning your life out in tiny plate-sized portions.

People want to start their own business or become financially independent. But you don’t end up a successful entrepreneur unless you find a way to appreciate the risk, the uncertainty, the repeated failures, and working insane hours on something you have no idea whether will be successful or not.

People want a partner, a spouse. But you don’t end up attracting someone amazing without appreciating the emotional turbulence that comes with weathering rejections, building the sexual tension that never gets released, and staring blankly at a phone that never rings. It’s part of the game of love. You can’t win if you don’t play.

What determines your success isn’t “What do you want to enjoy?” The question is, “What pain do you want to sustain?” The quality of your life is not determined by the quality of your positive experiences but the quality of your negative experiences. And to get good at dealing with negative experiences is to get good at dealing with life.

There’s a lot of crappy advice out there that says, “You’ve just got to want it enough!”

Everybody wants something. And everybody wants something enough. They just aren’t sure if it’s what they really want, if its what they want “enough” to sacrifice for.

Because if you want the benefits of something in life, you have to also bare the costs. If you want the beach body, you have to want the sweat, the soreness, the early mornings, and the hunger pangs. If you want the yacht, you have to also want the late nights, the risky business moves, and the possibility of pissing off a person or ten thousand.

If you find yourself wanting something month after month, year after year, yet nothing happens and you never come any closer to it, then maybe what you actually want is a fantasy, an idealization, an image and a false promise. Maybe what you want isn’t what you want, you just enjoy wanting. Maybe you don’t actually want it at all.

Sometimes I ask people, “Why do you choose to suffer?” These people tilt their heads and look at me like I have twelve noses. But I ask because that tells me far more about you than your desires and fantasies. Because you have to choose something. You can’t have a pain-free life. It can’t all be roses and unicorns. And ultimately that’s the hard question that matters. Pleasure is an easy question. And pretty much all of us have similar answers. The more interesting question is the pain. What is the pain that you want to sustain?

That answer will actually get you somewhere. It’s the question that can change your life. It’s what makes me, “me” and you, “you”. It’s what defines us and separates us and ultimately brings us together.

For most of my adolescence and young adulthood, I fantasized about being a musician — a rock star, in particular. Any badass guitar song I heard, I would always close my eyes and envision myself up on stage playing it to the screams of the crowd, people absolutely losing their minds to my sweet finger-noodling. This fantasy could keep me occupied for hours on end. But even then it was never a question of if I’d ever be up playing in front of screaming crowds, but when. I was biding my time before I could invest the proper amount of time and effort into getting out there and making it work. First, I needed to finish school. Then, I needed to make money. Then, I needed to find the time. Then… and then nothing.

Despite fantasizing about this for over half of my life, the reality never came. And it took me a long time and a lot of negative experiences to finally figure out why: I didn’t actually want it.

Music-Concert

I was in love with the result — the image of me on stage, people cheering, me rocking out, pouring my heart into what I’m playing — but I wasn’t in love with the process. And because of that, I failed at it. Repeatedly. Hell, I didn’t even try hard enough to fail at it. I hardly tried at all.

Our culture would tell me that I’ve somehow failed myself, that I’m a quitter or a loser. Self-help would say that I either wasn’t courageous enough, determined enough or I didn’t believe in myself enough. The entrepreneurial/start-up crowd would tell me that I chickened out on my dream and gave in to my conventional social conditioning. I’d be told to do affirmations or join a mastermind group or manifest or something.

But the truth is far less interesting than that: I thought I wanted something, but it turns out I didn’t. End of story.

I wanted the reward and not the struggle. I wanted the result and not the process. I was in love not with the fight but only the victory. And life doesn’t work that way.

Who you are is defined by the values you are willing to struggle for. People who enjoy the struggles of a gym are the ones who get in good shape. People who enjoy long workweeks and the politics of the corporate ladder are the ones who move up it. People who enjoy the stresses and uncertainty of the starving artist lifestyle are ultimately the ones who live it and make it.

This is not a call for willpower or “grit.” This is not another admonishment of “no pain, no gain.”

This is the most simple and basic component of life: our struggles determine our successes. So choose your struggles wisely, my friends.