She has the magic potion! Dr Natalie Cook 0 1278

Dr. Natalie cooke- Cover stoty- BiZnomics-

Brand Ambassador – Aquafresh Natural Drinking Water

By: Chantal D.
Photography by: Nuwan Ranaweera

Dr. Natalie cooke- Cover stoty- BiZnomics-

Since a long time ago, human has acknowledged the health benefits of foods. However, with the development of chemical drugs and pills, they have forgotten that foods they eat are directly linked to their health. Foods, in fact are the best medicines and therefore we should take into account carefully how we perceive and use them. Integrative medicine is one of the most practised ideas of wellness today.

Before we dive in, let’s start with the basics – what exactly IS Integrative medicine?

Integrative Nutrition Medicine is a system through the power of nutrition, primary food, active listening, high-mileage questions, goal setting, and other techniques unique to health coaching. While the average visit to the doctor only lasts eight minutes, the average health coaching session could be of about 50 minutes – an in-depth conversation between the health doctor and their clients.

Dr. Natalie cooke- Cover stoty- BiZnomics- An integrative medical doctor is a supportive mentor and wellness authority who helps others feel their best through individualized food and lifestyle changes that meet their unique needs and health goals. Often, they provide their services in private coaching practices with one-on-one sessions.

Integrative medicine isn’t about one diet or one way of living. Instead, focuses on bio-individuality – the idea that we are all different and have unique dietary, lifestyle, emotional, and physical needs. This means that integrative medicine does not believe in one-size-fits-all approach to health and wellness. Instead, integrative medical doctors work with clients to help them discover how to fuel their bodies and become healthiest, happiest version of themselves.

Dr. Natalie Cook is a medical doctor who currently practices and promotes integrative medicine through nutritive practice. She holds a Degree in Medicine and Surgery. She has previously worked at the Sri Lanka army hospital and Maharagama cancer hospital and completed her MBBS and Double Master’s Degree in Medical Administration. She also studied and specialized in drugless therapies.

BiZnomics had the pleasure of speaking to Dr. Natalie Cook in her journey as the doctor who introduced integrative medicine to Sri Lanka.

You are a professionally qualified doctor. What made you decide to move to integrative medicine?

I have always looked at the body as a whole. I don’t believe in compartmentalizing it into systems or organs and treating it separately. There is a truth to ancient medicine and I wanted to bring it back to the present. We have got so used to a quick fix that chemicals have become our go to for everything. I want to remind people that they shouldn’t be polluting the human body to such an extent.

 

Where did you receive your training?

My MBBS is from Tianjin Medical University. My specialization in Nutritive Medicine is associated with Mayo Clinic USA. I received all my certifications from CAM Sri Lanka.

Cont..

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Entrepreneurs are born or made 0 2348

By : Chantal D

Entrepreneurs are born or made?

Simon Arthur Wickramasinghe would have been a successful lawyer, had he continued to practice.  Although this was not what he had in the back of his mind?

If he was the ordinary, the Ceylon Biscuits Limited (CBL) would not have flagged its way to become the Sri Lanka’s largest confectionary manufacturer, producing and marketing 11 categories of branded food products catering to the diverse palates.

In 1939, Simon W. dropped out from the law college and bought over William biscuit factory from the owner. The lawyer capitalized in it and renamed the factory which came to be known as Williams Confectionary Limited. After relocating the location from Kolonnawa to Dehiwalaand then to Akuressa during the war.

Ceylon Biscuits - Meeting

The biscuits were handmade and baked in a long-fired oven. The dough was mixed by hand,rolled out and cut into shape and placed on trays. These were then baked and cooled. They were packed into gallon tins with a round lid for sale. It was sold locally.

Simon and his wife Enid had four children, sons.

Paul was their firstborn. He was in the first batch of graduates from the University of Peradeniya. He went on to setup Ceylon Essences. Ranjith, their second son excelled in the field of Engineering. Mineka, the third, also known as Micky was the first to follow in his father’s footsteps. Ramya was the youngest. His interests lay in food Science and Technology.

Simon W. was keen to expand the production of this non-traditional snack called a biscuit. A snack introduced by the British. He wanted to find new ways to make better biscuits, a greater variability and make all this easily available. He did this by introducing high-tech manufacturing machinery to the country.

Ceylon Biscuits - Chairman

During this period Mr. S W R D Bandaranayake was the Prime Minister of the country. Due to the mishandling of the economy imports were becoming challenging. Imports of biscuits were banned. It was up to Williams and Maliban which was opened in 1954, to meet the demand and satisfy the market.

Realize this in 1957, the biscuit production line was mechanized with the introduction of Baker Parkins lines from the UK. The then Governor General of Ceylon Sir Oliver Goonethilake declared open the new building which housed the factory.

As the company grew the ‘Williams’ brand packed biscuits in branded tins called ‘Orchid Assorted’ and ‘Cheese Cuts’ with advertising taglines that said ‘Pick the Best’. Simon W. even had many British nationals working for him at his factory.

The products made were Cream Crackers, Marie, Arrowroot, Tea Ginger Nuts, Nice, Custard Cream, Bourbon and Assorted.

In 1960 Simon W. installed an automatic wafer ovenwith 12 plates for better production. It also came with cream spread attached to a cooling conveyor. After cooling, it went to a cutting machine. The packing was done manually into 4 oz. packs and bulk pack into tins.

Munchee LogoTo Simon W. and his family this was a momentous and a historical venture. It was the birth of “Munchee”. The wafer manufactured were branded as Munchee. The name Munchee was given by Mr. Edger Corray.

Simon W. and his sons Mineka and Ramya realized that new machinery with high capacity was the need of the day. To expand, the Ministry of Industries approval had to be obtained. But, the ministry was not keen as private sector industry was not encouraged. Finally the Ministry wanted Williams Confectionary Limited to show exports to grant approval

With much difficulty an export order was obtained from Saudi Arabia. With this in hand approval for expansion was gained by Simon W. At that time William Confectionary Limited did not have land for expansion. This was the next obstacle faced by Simon and his sons. Finally land was bought at Pannipitiya.

Ceylon Biscuits Limited was incorporated in 1968 as a new company under the leadership of Simon Wickramasinghe’s son Mineka Wickramasinghe.

Simon Arthur (Artie) Wickramasinghe renamed Chairman of Ceylon Biscuits Limited until August 1984 when he passed away leaving behind a legacy of fair play, both by the worker and the consumer.

Today CBL offers diversity of captivating tastes to International consumers, stormed export market gaining acceptance in 52 countries and counting.

Winning Export Awards since the year 2003, having won recognition by awarding bodies including National Chamber of Exports and Presidential Exports Awards.

When it came to Simon W. a self-made Entrepreneur, the sky was not the limit.

Entrepreneurs aren’t born, they are made. And they are made just like anything else, through hard work.

 

Hassan Esufally – He has a story to tell! Comments Off on Hassan Esufally – He has a story to tell! 748

Hassan Esufally-01.jpg

‘’Running a marathon is all about perseverance, dedication and a healthy dose of motivation. ‘’

Running a marathon is a tough challenge. If it was your first marathon, then just getting to the start was an achievement, never mind the finish line. Completing a marathon – regardless of the time – should be considered an amazing achievement. 

Hassan Esufally-02

How many amazing sights they see – the scenery on an amazing trail run or the electric sights of a big city marathon. Did you hook up with any runners and make new friends? How did you feel? Did you get your nutrition and hydration right? Did you run strong and feel good? 

The adventure marathoner Hassan Esufally, the first Sri Lankan in history to run a marathon in all seven continents by completing the difficult Antarctic Ice Marathon with a time of 8 hours and 35 minutes, shared his stirring experience with us. 

The champion marathoner endured the 42.2km event under tough conditions with falling snow and poor visibility which required a phenomenal effort. Previous multiple times winners of both the Antarctic Ice Marathon and 100km events who participated in the event, were quoted as saying that this was one of the toughest years in the competition. 

Hassan Esufally, one of Sri Lanka’s leading marathoners recently took on the ambitious mission of earning the prestigious and highly sought-after Seven Continents Marathon Club Membership. The challenging endeavor required him to complete some of the world’s toughest and most exclusive marathons across all seven continents. Before the Antarctic Ice Marathon he was also the first Sri Lankan in history to complete the world’s hardest marathon, the Inca Trail Marathon. He has completed marathons in Europe (Stockholm Marathon in June 2017), Asia (Colombo Marathon in October 2017), Australia (Melbourne Marathon in 2014 and 2016), and Boston Marathon in USA (April 2018) and the Big Five Marathon in South Africa (June 2018) – putting Sri Lanka on the marathon map.

By: Chantal D 
Photography by: Eranga Pilimatalawwe

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