Global non – inclusive growth; Extract from article by Christean Lagarde 0 533

IMF Chief Christean Lagarde in her message in the IMF Annual Report 2018 says that countries should promote an open and rule basis multilateral trading system, and should strive to make new technologies work for all – boosting rather than undermining inclusive growth and financial stability.

According to her, the growth momentum of the global economy is under pressure from a slow erosion / weakening of trust in institution due to, a) the lingering effects of the global financial crisis. b) perception that the rewards of economic growth and globalization are not being shared fairly and equitably. c) anxiety over future of jobs and economic opportunity. d) weak governance frameworks that often facilitate corruption. She further emphasizes that population ageing and over-funding of pension schemes are holding back economic momentum. Income disparities are widening and if unaddressed the climate change is likely to severely disrupt economic wellbeing in the decades ahead.

Lagarde urged that European Union (EU) leaders need to redouble their efforts to lift living standards across the continent as populist movements question the merits of integration. The poorer southern countries in the EU have not caught up with their richer northern peers – a gap that has worsened since the global financial crisis. Between 2008 and 2017, the average annual growth in real income per person, was negative in the five southern members of the euro zone, hit hardest by the crisis.

She urged EU countries to reform their labor markets so that firms have greater flexibility in hiring and firing workers and their business climate becoming more welcoming to investment. These developments it is hoped, would increase spending on research and development.

Lagarde’s remarks come amid a turbulent debate over Britain’s exit from the EU, as well as amidst signs of spluttering growth in the world’s biggest economic bloc. The IMF partly blamed softening demand across Europe for having to cut its 2019 forecast for global growth, for the second time in three months.

South Asia to remain fastest growing region in world

The World Bank Global Economic Prospects Report released on 05th February 2019, expects South Asian regional growth to accelerate to 7.1 percent in 2019, under pinned by strengthening investment and robust consumption. India is forecast to grow by 7.3 percent as consumption remains robust and investment growth continues. Bangladesh is expected to grow by 7.0 percent supported by strong construction and infrastructure investments. Nepal growth forecast to moderate to 5.9 percent. Sri Lanka is anticipated to grow by 4.0 percent supported by domestic demand and infrastructure projects. Pakistan is projected to decelerate by 3.3 percent with financial conditions tightening.

By: Econsult

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Past is a Reflection of the Future – History does repeat itself 0 740

By : Kenneth De Zilwa

The Global Stock Markets have rallied beyond its mean of 50.45 pct on three previous occasions and on all three we have had a significant correction lower, with balance sheets wiped out.

The same is witnessed in 2016-2017; the Market Capitalization is currently at 97 pct of GDP. While Gross Fixed Capital Formation as a percentage of GDP is indicating a declining trend (Blue line). This is indicative of a trend going against fundamentals and the ability generates such high market capitalization gains remains questionable.

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Therefore, Econsult expects 2019 to be a year of lower corrections in the global stock markets. This downturn can signal another deeper adjustment in global GDP as our Sri Lanka too must be watchful, as our external finances can be under stress.

The Silver Lining, in the Emerging ‘Silver Economy’ 0 573

By: Dr. Kenneth De Zilwa

It has become a fad to argue that political and corporate leaders ought to be younger, the world around us has undergone extensive change over the past few decades. In the context of population ageing experienced in many parts of the world, it is argued in political and business realms that leaders require to be more age appropriate and not aged. The old guard, it is contended, is not in keeping with the winds of rapid technological transformation that is taking place.

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The 21st century business leadership belongs to the youth who are keeping abreast with technological innovations, robotics, and artificial intelligence in the corporate world. The global economic system seems to be sending out signals suggesting a need for change in the age composition of political and corporate leadership.

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Yet there are tendencies in the world today to embark upon a new strategy of capturing the potential of the silver economy which is estimated to be USD 15 trillion per year by 2020. The silver economy is thus becoming a significant mega trend that is shaping the world. In contrast to the past, we are living in an unprecedented era of the global longevity cycle. The age composition of world leaders and policy makers shaping this thought process is indicative of the fact that as the world population is ageing, & more and more business and political leaders will invariably be those with silver hair tips, representing the silver economic ethos. The data indicates that by 2050 the population segment of silver tips, i.e. those above the age of 60 years, will double from its current 890 million to reach 2 billion people, thereby accounting for 22percent of the global population. The UNDP projections also indicate that between 2018 and  2040, China’s 65+  population  would  jump  by  almost  150  percent,  from  135 to 340  million.  Thus by 2040, China will be a “super aged society” with 25 percent of its people being 62 years of age or older, while the Asia-Pacific region would be home to approximately 1.2 billion older people out of a total of 2.1 billion worldwide in that category by the year 2050. It’s not only the sheer numbers of individuals, but the sheer spending power of the silver hair tips that plays an even more important part in shaping global mega trends. According to Merrill Lynch, the investment bankers, the silver economy will grow from its current USD 7 trillion to a population segment with the spending power of USD 15 trillion per year by 2020. This would amount to approximately 16.4 percent of World GDP.  Such will be the scale and influence of this market segment.

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