Foods That Reduce Human Growth Hormone 0 783

By: Cameron Blake
Source: Browngirl

Before you put another bite in your mouth, find out if it will interfere with your human growth hormone production. These 8 foods that reduce human growth hormone can impede your best efforts at the gym. You may think you are doing everything right to maximize hormone production however, the wrong dinner or before-bed snack could be your downfall.

Are you really what you eat?

When it comes to your hormone levels, the answer could very well be yes. That is why knowing these foods that reduce HGH levels are vital to your well-being.
Here is the list of top HGH inhibiting foods:

  1. Sugar
  2. Alcohol
  3. Caffeine
  4. Pre-packaged meals
  5. Acidic foods
  6. Bread and other Carbohydrates
  7. Protein
  8. Spicy foods

Why Do Some Foods Reduce Human Growth Hormone Production?

You probably were shocked to see some of the items on that list. After all, your body needs protein to manufacture human growth hormone. How could it possibly be on this list? Continue reading to find out why.

For some of these 8 foods that reduce human growth hormone, it is not as much about the food as it is about the timing of consumption. Certain foods will minimize HGH production if eaten before bed. The reason: they can raise blood insulin levels that can inhibit human growth hormone production.
Cont..

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The Sun Festival – A tradition that brings past to the Nation… Comments Off on The Sun Festival – A tradition that brings past to the Nation… 902

Sun Festival“A year has departed
A new has started
All have awaited
For a festival elated
Mistakes are corrected
Good deeds are committed
The crops are harvested
For a tradition that brings a Nation together!”

‘Aluth Avurudda’ one of the biggest celebrations in Sri Lanka starts on 13th of April and ends in 14th of April that features lots of rituals and customs is one of the must things to experience.

Based on the movement of the sun from Meena Rashiya (House of Pisces) to the Mesha Rashiya (House of Aries) marks the end of the harvest season, Sri Lankans welcome the New Year in April with lots of rituals, fireworks and gourmet of traditional sweets.

The Sun festival or the Sinhala and Tamil New Year is a ritual performed to honor the Sun God for hundreds and hundreds of years, comes with a long history that is not experienced anywhere else.

The unique rituals and the traditions are what make the New Year special.

Neutral Period (Nonagathaya)

The New Year ritual starts from the neutral period where people keep off from all work and engage in religious activities to get the blessings to prepare for the New Year.

Lighting the hearth (Lipa gini melaweema)

With the dawn of the New Year comes the first ritual, the lighting of the hearth of the house to prepare milk rice to symbolize the prosperity.

First meal at the New Year table (Ahara anubawaya)

Food plays a major role in the New Year celebration at each house. A table with kiribath (milk rice), bananas, kevum, kokis, aggala, aasmi, aluwa, welithalapa, and many other traditional sweets become the centerpiece of any table. Every family that celebrates New Year enjoys the festival at the auspicious time after lighting an oil lamp.

Starting work and exchanging money (Weda alleema saha ganu denu)

Once the family finishes the New Year meal, they engage in some work to symbolize starting their work for the New Year. Next they perform a transaction among the family members and other respected parties. This also done with the well to thank it for the clear water provided the past year.

Sun Festival

Anointing oil (Hisa thel gaama)

Oil prepared according to a special mixture of herbs are anointed on people’s heads to bless them with health and healing. This ritual is usually done by a religious leader, a family head or an elder superior in the village.

New Year sweets.

You cannot speak about the Sinhala and Tamil New Year without having to talk about food. These are some of the sweets prepared at almost all households during this time and shared amongst the families and friends to extend friendship or to forget any mishap during the past year.

Konda kewum – Made with coconut trickle and rice flour and deep fried.

Aasmi – A crunchy traditional sweet topped with traditional caramel syrup.

Kokis – Fried, crispy sweet made from rice flour and coconut milk.

Mung kewum – A diamond shaped sweet with a crunchy crust and a sweet paste of green gram inside.

Avurudu music and games

This is a season that’s focused on family. During this time people return home to celebrate the festival with the rest of the family. Fun games and activities play an important part at this time.

Playing the rabana (A large drum people sit around and play)
Traditional board games (Olinda keliya, Pancha demima)
Kotta pora (Pillow fight)
Kanamutti bindeema (Breaking the pots)
Kamba adeema (tug-war)
Banis keema (Eating buns)
Lissana gaha (Climbing the greasy pole)

April is perhaps one of the best months in Sri Lanka due to the Sinhala and Tamil New Year festival which cannot be seen anywhere else.

Devil Dancing to Cure Illness 0 1523

Devil-Dancing-Sri-Lanka-01

By: T.V Perera

Masked dancing is practised in various forms in certain Asian countries notably India, Bhutan, Tibet, China, Korea, Thailand Malaysia and Sri Lanka as well as among different tribes in Africa. In India, Bhutan, and Tibet masked dancing known as Cham, takes the form of a Buddhist monastery festival where the ritual dance is accompanied by chanting, sounds of cymbals, longhorns and drums with the dancers wearing wooden and brightly coloured larger than life papier mache, intricately painted.

 Devil-Dancing-Sri-Lanka-02In Sri Lanka, masked dancing which has a tradition all its own is considered a sort of ceremonial dance. Commonly known as ‘Devil dancing’ due to the masks worn  being related to malignant beings such as the Gara Yaka, Reeri Yaka, Mahasona and Suniyan Yaka it is believed to have prevailed in the country even before the introduction of Buddhism and is still largely resorted to especially in the Southern and Uva Provinces. The chief characteristic of mask dancing is that all forms are directed to a super human being.

‘’According to folk belief, demons exhort offerings from human beings by sending on them sicknesses ranging from deafness to cholera and other calamities including fear of death.’’

These misfortunes it is believed can be eliminated by proper offerings accompanied by suitable ceremonies. There are 18 physical and psychological ailments known as sanni in Sinhala tradition, attributed to demons.  Masked dance healing liturgies referred to as sanni yakuma are adopted to liberate people from these sicknesses caused by unscrupulous hideous demons.

Devil-Dancing-Sri-Lanka-03

Commonly known as a Thovile, the mask dance itself is the representation of the super natural being by a dancer or a troupe of dancers and the descending of the invoked-being into the dancer, and sometimes even into some of the onlookers. Several forms of mask dances (thovils) exist, each for a specific purpose. A thovil ceremony performed in times of sickness has always been interesting and although elaborate, is merely an exorcism to expel the demon (yaka) by which the sick person is believed to be possessed.

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