Economic, Social and Environmental impacts of fast fashion Comments Off on Economic, Social and Environmental impacts of fast fashion 4059

  • $400 billion worth of clothing is wasted every year!
  • One garbage truck of clothes is burned or sent to landfill every second.
  • That’s enough to fill 1.5 Empire State buildings every day.
  • And it’s $400 billion of wasted clothing every year.
  • The average consumer bought 60% more cloths in 2014 than in 2000. But kept each item for half as long.
  • The world’s growing middle class is also driving consumption. And a 400% rise in world GDP by 2050 is only going to increase demand.
  • Making cloths uses a lot of the world’s resources. It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt. That’s what one person drinks in 2.5 years.
  • And making and washing one pair of jeans emits the same CO2 as driving 69 miles.
  • The fashion industry also has a heavy human cost… Garment workers in Bangladesh earn less than $100 per month. Just 30% of what they need to live a decent life.
  • There are initiatives to make our demand for clothing less damaging. Germany now reuses half of all used clothing.
  • Scientists are developing new materials that demand less from the environment.
  • And start-ups are encouraging consumers to rent, not buy clothes.

(Source: World Resources Institute)

Modeler : Sudhith Vidhush

How are you changing what you wear?

Think about how many sweaters, scarves and other clothes were given as gifts? How many times people wear them before throwing them out?

You will be surprised to hear probably far fewer than you think. One garbage truck of clothes is burned or sent to landfills every second!

Gone are the days when people would buy a shirt and wear it for years. In a world of accelerating demand for appeal, consumers want – and can increasingly afford – new clothing after wearing garments only a few times. Entire business models are built on the premise of “fast fashion,” providing cloths cheaply and quickly to consumer through shorter fashion cycles.

This linear fashion model of buying, wearing and quickly discarding clothes negatively impacts people and planet’s resources.

Here’s look at the economic, social and environmental implications:

The Economics

According to the Ellen MCArthur Foundation, clothing production has approximately doubled in the last 15 years, driven by a growing middle-class population across the globe and increased per capita sales in developed economies. An expected 400 percent increase in world GDP by 2050 will mean even greater demand for clothing.

This could be an opportunity to do better. One report found that addressing environmental and social problems created by the fashion industry would provide a $192 billion overall benefit to the global economy by 2030. The annual value of clothing discarded permanently is more than $400 billion.

It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt.

Enough water for one person to drink for 21/2 years.

The Environmental impacts

Apparel production is also resource and emissions-intensive. Consider that:

  • Making a pair of jeans produces as much greenhouse gases as driving a car more than 80 miles.
  • Discarding clothing made of non-biodegradable fabrics can sit in landfills for up to 200 years.
  • It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt, enough to meet the average person’s drinking needs for two-and-a-half years.

The Societal impacts

Clothing production has helped spur growth in developing economies, but a closer look reveals a number of social challenges.

For instance:

  • According to non-profit remake, 75 million people are making our cloths today, and 80% of apparel is made by young women between the ages of 18 and 24.
  • Garment workers, primarily women, in Bangladesh make about $96 per month. The government’s wage boards suggested that a garment worker needs 3.5 times that amount in order to live a “decent life with basic facilities.”
  • A 2018 U.S. Department of Labor report found evidence of forced and child labor in the fashion industry in Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Turkey, Vietnam and other countries.
  • Rapid consumption of apparel and the need to deliver on short fashion cycles stresses production resources, often resulting in supply chains that put profits ahead of human welfare.

Designer: Nisansala Deegala
Model: Harini Silva

So, what do we do?

So, what does a more sustainable apparel industry look like, and how do we get there?

We’re starting to see some early signs of an industry in transition. Business models based on longevity, such as Rent the Runway and Gwynnie Bee, are the beginnings of an industry that supports reuse instead of rapid and irresponsible consumption.

Just as Netflix reimagined traditional film rental services and Lyft disrupted transportation, we are beginning to see option for consumers to lease clothing rather than buy and stash them in their closets. Ideally, an “end of ownership” in apparel will be implemented in a way that considers impacts of jobs, communities and the environment.

This is only the beginning of a radical transformation required. Apparel companies will increasingly have to confront the elephant in the boardroom and decouple their business growth from resource use. To meet tomorrow’s demand for clothing in innovative ways; companies will need to do what they have never done before: design, test and invest in business models that reuse cloths and minimize their useful life. For apparel companies, it’s time to disrupt or be disrupted.

By: Cameron Blake

Image Curtsey: Eranga Pilimatalawwe

Why women are better drivers? Comments Off on Why women are better drivers? 485

Article by: Cameron Blake 

Marketing is about presenting your company’s message in repeated transmissions, without causing the buyer resentment. To achieve this, marketing must attract customers based on the values and principles that they have in common with the brand. When consumers can identify their values within a brand and constantly be reinforced by that very same value system, consumers tend to become loyal customers and passionate ambassadors – since it is ‘their’ value they are promoting. You need to have a sensitive and relatable personality in order to achieve this. So it is no shocker women are bringing a different outlook to the marketing world and in turn driving results faster than ever.

Here are three principles that women use which make them the most successful marketers.

Why-women-are-better-drivers

Confidence: As marketing professional, women are able to get their ideas across by using a soft and gentle approach while achieving the same objective, promoting the brand value. Collaborators: Women have a better ability to collaborate in business. They are team builders and can understand all perspectives. Women have one goal during a conflict and that is to facilitate some sort of compromise and happy-medium space. Communication: A trait most women carry is being a good listener, and it is something women value in a partnership as well whether that be personal or business related. Women tend to listen before they react in a situation and are better at picking up more body language and voice inflection cues. 

Why women are better drivers-02

 

In order to push through the complex nature of a maledominated corporate world, women in marketing must continue to break through personal and society’s constraints placed upon them.

By enforcing the support and progress of women toward executive-level positions, we will see the evolution of diverse leadership in the corporate world. 

The marketing world is certainly filled with relentless women who have made it to the top and reached success beyond boundaries.

Cont..

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The Big Question Is Are You in the Right Job? 0 630

By : Chantal D

No matter what your job is, keep adding skills, expanding knowledge and building confidence.

Have you ever asked yourself if you are in the right job?

How about if, and when you should quit a job? You need to know when it’s simply time to double-down or move on from a position.

The first thing you need to do is a self-assessment. You need to ask yourself the right questions. You need to determine if the problem is the job itself, or you. Make the effort to take a serious look at if it’s you or the job. This assessment will focus your energy on fixing the right thing. Either the job or your approach and attitude about it.

If it is your attitude and approach, and there are benefits to the job, commit and anchor in. If you think the role is wrong, look at where you want to be, what other people are doing, where people are making money. Make a concentrated effort to move to the position that you want and the one that will serve you best.

When accessing your current role or a new one, review these points:

01. Company Performance and Culture

Company Performance and Culture

-Are the environment and people positive and supportive?  Or are people negative and tight with resources?

-Is the company ethical?

-Do people enjoy their jobs?

-Are people showing up on time?

-Do co-workers like each other?

-Do people feel secure in their positions?

 

2. Senior Management and Leadership

Senior Management and Leadership

-Do you like the mission?

-Does your boss respect you and your efforts?

-Are there clear goals on how to grow the business?

-Is company management investing in the business?

-Is the company forward thinking or reactionary?

-Does Senior Management appear smart, ethical and competent?

 

3. Compensation

Compensation

-Are you making money?

-Are you being fairly paid and your job title reflects the scope of your
responsibilities and what you actually do?

-Do people feel underpaid and overworked?

 

Opportunity

Opportunity

-If you aren’t making enough money are you learning other skills, making contacts, networking?

-What other benefits are you receiving that compensate for the poor pay?

-Do you know what you’re learning at work? Can you see your resume growing and feel your confidence increasing over time?

You might discover that a small, solvent company with a great leader might be the best option for you. But it starts with you, if your attitude is wrong, you will pass on good opportunities. Keep in mind, the position has to serve you and your best interests. Put yourself first. You have to be selfish until you can be generous. Once you decide that it’s in your best interest to move to a new position, keep these pointers in mind:

  1. The Big Question Is ArDecide that you are going to get a job and eliminate all other options
  2. Take the attitude that getting a job is your job
  3. Stay connected in the workforce
  4. Have the attitude that you will find a job
  5. Companies don’t hire resumes they hire people that can help move the company forward
  6. Do NOT rely on headhunters and recruiters to get you your next job
  7. Do NOT rely on the HR department and do everything to bypass them
  8. You in the Right Job?

As you look for a job, don’t just focus on one industry. Keep an open mind and focus instead on people. What kind of person would you want to work for? Who is doing the kinds of things you want to assist with? How much could you help them? Brainstorm three, four or five people today who could change your life forever.

No matter what your job is, you can always improve your situation in life. Keep adding skills, knowledge and confidence and you will become more valuable to the marketplace.