Economic, Social and Environmental impacts of fast fashion Comments Off on Economic, Social and Environmental impacts of fast fashion 1580

  • $400 billion worth of clothing is wasted every year!
  • One garbage truck of clothes is burned or sent to landfill every second.
  • That’s enough to fill 1.5 Empire State buildings every day.
  • And it’s $400 billion of wasted clothing every year.
  • The average consumer bought 60% more cloths in 2014 than in 2000. But kept each item for half as long.
  • The world’s growing middle class is also driving consumption. And a 400% rise in world GDP by 2050 is only going to increase demand.
  • Making cloths uses a lot of the world’s resources. It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt. That’s what one person drinks in 2.5 years.
  • And making and washing one pair of jeans emits the same CO2 as driving 69 miles.
  • The fashion industry also has a heavy human cost… Garment workers in Bangladesh earn less than $100 per month. Just 30% of what they need to live a decent life.
  • There are initiatives to make our demand for clothing less damaging. Germany now reuses half of all used clothing.
  • Scientists are developing new materials that demand less from the environment.
  • And start-ups are encouraging consumers to rent, not buy clothes.

(Source: World Resources Institute)

Modeler : Sudhith Vidhush

How are you changing what you wear?

Think about how many sweaters, scarves and other clothes were given as gifts? How many times people wear them before throwing them out?

You will be surprised to hear probably far fewer than you think. One garbage truck of clothes is burned or sent to landfills every second!

Gone are the days when people would buy a shirt and wear it for years. In a world of accelerating demand for appeal, consumers want – and can increasingly afford – new clothing after wearing garments only a few times. Entire business models are built on the premise of “fast fashion,” providing cloths cheaply and quickly to consumer through shorter fashion cycles.

This linear fashion model of buying, wearing and quickly discarding clothes negatively impacts people and planet’s resources.

Here’s look at the economic, social and environmental implications:

The Economics

According to the Ellen MCArthur Foundation, clothing production has approximately doubled in the last 15 years, driven by a growing middle-class population across the globe and increased per capita sales in developed economies. An expected 400 percent increase in world GDP by 2050 will mean even greater demand for clothing.

This could be an opportunity to do better. One report found that addressing environmental and social problems created by the fashion industry would provide a $192 billion overall benefit to the global economy by 2030. The annual value of clothing discarded permanently is more than $400 billion.

It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt.

Enough water for one person to drink for 21/2 years.

The Environmental impacts

Apparel production is also resource and emissions-intensive. Consider that:

  • Making a pair of jeans produces as much greenhouse gases as driving a car more than 80 miles.
  • Discarding clothing made of non-biodegradable fabrics can sit in landfills for up to 200 years.
  • It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt, enough to meet the average person’s drinking needs for two-and-a-half years.

The Societal impacts

Clothing production has helped spur growth in developing economies, but a closer look reveals a number of social challenges.

For instance:

  • According to non-profit remake, 75 million people are making our cloths today, and 80% of apparel is made by young women between the ages of 18 and 24.
  • Garment workers, primarily women, in Bangladesh make about $96 per month. The government’s wage boards suggested that a garment worker needs 3.5 times that amount in order to live a “decent life with basic facilities.”
  • A 2018 U.S. Department of Labor report found evidence of forced and child labor in the fashion industry in Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Turkey, Vietnam and other countries.
  • Rapid consumption of apparel and the need to deliver on short fashion cycles stresses production resources, often resulting in supply chains that put profits ahead of human welfare.

Designer: Nisansala Deegala
Model: Harini Silva

So, what do we do?

So, what does a more sustainable apparel industry look like, and how do we get there?

We’re starting to see some early signs of an industry in transition. Business models based on longevity, such as Rent the Runway and Gwynnie Bee, are the beginnings of an industry that supports reuse instead of rapid and irresponsible consumption.

Just as Netflix reimagined traditional film rental services and Lyft disrupted transportation, we are beginning to see option for consumers to lease clothing rather than buy and stash them in their closets. Ideally, an “end of ownership” in apparel will be implemented in a way that considers impacts of jobs, communities and the environment.

This is only the beginning of a radical transformation required. Apparel companies will increasingly have to confront the elephant in the boardroom and decouple their business growth from resource use. To meet tomorrow’s demand for clothing in innovative ways; companies will need to do what they have never done before: design, test and invest in business models that reuse cloths and minimize their useful life. For apparel companies, it’s time to disrupt or be disrupted.

By: Cameron Blake

Image Curtsey: Eranga Pilimatalawwe

Changing Perception of Women in the Workplace 0 64

By: Cameron Blake

Source: The Changing Role of Women in Business

 

A worldwide change in gender perception puts more and more expectations on women; hence inter alia the role of women in business undergoes continuous progress. It is currently a popular issue touched on by society and aims to change the perspective of professionally successful women. This topic is extremely interesting considering the fact that more and more women have been promoted to executive roles in the business sector.

The status of women, especially in European countries, in the United States, and in some countries in Asia has improved considerably in the last 50 years. Women nowadays possess unlimited access to education and training that continuously develops, providing many women with the necessary qualifications to aspire to jobs in senior management. No longer are women associated with low expectations and qualifications, in terms of both education and the workforce positions.

There is no doubt that significant progress has been achieved in strengthening gender equality in the labor market over recent decades. Women have been moving steadily into occupations, professions and managerial jobs previously reserved only for men.

What is more, women now seek and obtain the highest leadership roles in education, government and business.

Women’s advancement in management career is influenced by personality factors and, organizational factors. These are also various societal and institutional factors that contribute to encourage employees to hire women instead of men. It is important to keep in mind that there are important institutional differences between countries, notably regarding their educational and academic systems.

Cont..

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Aquafresh -“Bringing Nature to Life” 0 73

Enhancing Healthy Living through Nature’s Resources

Aquafresh, which is synonymous with ‘Water for life’ is a well-reputed brand name and is the leader in the bottled water industry in Sri Lanka. Expanding their profile as a trendsetter in the industry, the company, Access Natural Water (Pvt) Ltd comes up with innovative techniques when it comes to fulfilling the thirst of the nation.

AquaFresh-Orange

 

At the dawn of the new millennium, Mr. Shanil Perera, Director/ COO of Access Natural Water Pvt. Ltd carried out intense research with the intention of bringing nature to life. He succeeded in scouting out the purest source and biological purification process and gave life to the brand Aquafresh, the pioneer of the Bottled Water Market in Sri Lanka. Being the first to obtain SLS 894 in Sri Lanka, Aquafresh never ceases to amaze the nation with its effort to provide the best innovative products which bring health benefits to the consumers.

From the inception, Aquafresh began to escalate the standards of the bottled drinking water market in Sri Lanka. First and foremost would be the source of water of Aquafresh which is the aquifer in the Labugamkanda rainforest. The water from the source is natural as nature has intended it to be and because of this, there is no reason to use any chemicals to purify the water. Further, the biological purification process mimics nature’s way of purifying its water, which is aeration, sand filtering, micron filtering and UV ray which is equal to the rays of the sun.

Cont..

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