Economic, Social and Environmental impacts of fast fashion Comments Off on Economic, Social and Environmental impacts of fast fashion 5354

  • $400 billion worth of clothing is wasted every year!
  • One garbage truck of clothes is burned or sent to landfill every second.
  • That’s enough to fill 1.5 Empire State buildings every day.
  • And it’s $400 billion of wasted clothing every year.
  • The average consumer bought 60% more cloths in 2014 than in 2000. But kept each item for half as long.
  • The world’s growing middle class is also driving consumption. And a 400% rise in world GDP by 2050 is only going to increase demand.
  • Making cloths uses a lot of the world’s resources. It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt. That’s what one person drinks in 2.5 years.
  • And making and washing one pair of jeans emits the same CO2 as driving 69 miles.
  • The fashion industry also has a heavy human cost… Garment workers in Bangladesh earn less than $100 per month. Just 30% of what they need to live a decent life.
  • There are initiatives to make our demand for clothing less damaging. Germany now reuses half of all used clothing.
  • Scientists are developing new materials that demand less from the environment.
  • And start-ups are encouraging consumers to rent, not buy clothes.

(Source: World Resources Institute)

Modeler : Sudhith Vidhush

How are you changing what you wear?

Think about how many sweaters, scarves and other clothes were given as gifts? How many times people wear them before throwing them out?

You will be surprised to hear probably far fewer than you think. One garbage truck of clothes is burned or sent to landfills every second!

Gone are the days when people would buy a shirt and wear it for years. In a world of accelerating demand for appeal, consumers want – and can increasingly afford – new clothing after wearing garments only a few times. Entire business models are built on the premise of “fast fashion,” providing cloths cheaply and quickly to consumer through shorter fashion cycles.

This linear fashion model of buying, wearing and quickly discarding clothes negatively impacts people and planet’s resources.

Here’s look at the economic, social and environmental implications:

The Economics

According to the Ellen MCArthur Foundation, clothing production has approximately doubled in the last 15 years, driven by a growing middle-class population across the globe and increased per capita sales in developed economies. An expected 400 percent increase in world GDP by 2050 will mean even greater demand for clothing.

This could be an opportunity to do better. One report found that addressing environmental and social problems created by the fashion industry would provide a $192 billion overall benefit to the global economy by 2030. The annual value of clothing discarded permanently is more than $400 billion.

It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt.

Enough water for one person to drink for 21/2 years.

The Environmental impacts

Apparel production is also resource and emissions-intensive. Consider that:

  • Making a pair of jeans produces as much greenhouse gases as driving a car more than 80 miles.
  • Discarding clothing made of non-biodegradable fabrics can sit in landfills for up to 200 years.
  • It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one cotton shirt, enough to meet the average person’s drinking needs for two-and-a-half years.

The Societal impacts

Clothing production has helped spur growth in developing economies, but a closer look reveals a number of social challenges.

For instance:

  • According to non-profit remake, 75 million people are making our cloths today, and 80% of apparel is made by young women between the ages of 18 and 24.
  • Garment workers, primarily women, in Bangladesh make about $96 per month. The government’s wage boards suggested that a garment worker needs 3.5 times that amount in order to live a “decent life with basic facilities.”
  • A 2018 U.S. Department of Labor report found evidence of forced and child labor in the fashion industry in Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Turkey, Vietnam and other countries.
  • Rapid consumption of apparel and the need to deliver on short fashion cycles stresses production resources, often resulting in supply chains that put profits ahead of human welfare.

Designer: Nisansala Deegala
Model: Harini Silva

So, what do we do?

So, what does a more sustainable apparel industry look like, and how do we get there?

We’re starting to see some early signs of an industry in transition. Business models based on longevity, such as Rent the Runway and Gwynnie Bee, are the beginnings of an industry that supports reuse instead of rapid and irresponsible consumption.

Just as Netflix reimagined traditional film rental services and Lyft disrupted transportation, we are beginning to see option for consumers to lease clothing rather than buy and stash them in their closets. Ideally, an “end of ownership” in apparel will be implemented in a way that considers impacts of jobs, communities and the environment.

This is only the beginning of a radical transformation required. Apparel companies will increasingly have to confront the elephant in the boardroom and decouple their business growth from resource use. To meet tomorrow’s demand for clothing in innovative ways; companies will need to do what they have never done before: design, test and invest in business models that reuse cloths and minimize their useful life. For apparel companies, it’s time to disrupt or be disrupted.

By: Cameron Blake

Image Curtsey: Eranga Pilimatalawwe

Make timely moves to stay competitive 0 525

By Dr. Kishu Gomes
Prominent business leader, Corporate Icon & Management Consultant, Kishu
Gomes was the Chief of Sri Lanka Tourism (SLTDA & SLTPB) after leading a
multinational operation in Sri Lanka for over 2 decades. He continues to consult
businesses and corporates to take a transformational journey.

Many things cause organizational change. Covid19 is one big example only. Other than
pandemics or epidemics, economic downturns, tougher trading conditions, finance cost
escalation, technological changes, competitive pressures, including mergers and
acquisitions, customer pressure, particularly shifting markets, government legislation or
regulatory changes etc.
All organizations are in flux: changing their focuses, expanding or contracting their activities, and rethinking their products and services. Most organizations more than ten years old look nothing like they did even five years ago. Pre and post-COVID 19 are two different worlds altogether. And it is likely that in the next year or two organizations will not look as they do today.

In this context, managers have to be able to introduce and manage change to ensure
the organizational objectives of change are met, and they have to ensure that they gain
the commitment of their people, both during and after implementation. Often, at the
same time, they also have to ensure that business continues as usual.
Resistance to change may be active or passive, overt or covert, individual or organized,
aggressive or timid, and on occasions totally justified. Organizational change
management takes into consideration both the processes and tools that managers use
to make changes at an organizational level. Most organizations want change
implemented with the least resistance and with the most buy-in as possible. For
this to occur, change must be applied with a structured approach so that
transition from one type of behavior to another will be smooth.

As the speed of change continues to increase, change management is a fundamental competency needed by managers, supervisors, Human Resources staff, and organization leaders. To tap your wisdom, my recent survey about change management afforded me the opportunity to consolidate hundreds of years of experience in change management. Here, in your… Change is possible; the need for change is increasing; change capability is necessary for organizations that will succeed in the future. Change management challenges organizations to succeed during times of great change. Employees love to stay in their comfort zone because it is familiar and they know what their expectations are. Many employees fear change and the manager has the responsibility to help employees move through the change process. Managers need to develop themselves as a role model for change and create an environment where all of their employees will get aboard and be willing to make the changes that are needed. It takes a smart and intuitive manager to manage change in any business organization. In order for a manager to effectively manage change in the business setting, they need to develop an understanding of how employees react to change. Every employee will have a different view of change and what their reaction to change will be. It is important that the manager stays visible and is always willing to jump in and help the employees manage change. In order to be an effective manager of change, the employees must continue to feel valued and respected by their manager. If a manager helps the employees through the process of learning to let go of the old way of doing things, they can help the employee adjust to the new changes in their working environment.

Deal with resistance
When a manager is facilitating change in the business world, they need to be
aware and acknowledge that resistance to change is normal and common.

Smart managers will recognize that resistance to change can actually be viewed as a positive sign that the employees are involved with the changes that are occurring in their working environment. If employees do not believe in their managers and lack trust in their decisions or there have been explanations of the reasons for change and how it will benefit the employees, that manager will have difficulty managing any changes that need to be implemented.
Another effective tool for a manager to use to implement change in the business setting
is to involve the employees in the decisions that are being made to change their working
environment. This is a method to help the employees feel valued and more motivated
to go along with the implementation of the changes. This becomes a win-win situation
for the organization, the manager, and all of the employees. Managers that involve their
employees and let them become part of the change will have an easier road for
acceptance from the employees.

Communication is the manager’s best friend. This is how the manager prepares the employees for the changes and can clearly clarify the expectations and expected outcomes. The manager is the individual that clearly can communicate the rationale for the change and answer the employee’s questions and stress the importance for the change to occur. Managers need to remain positive and upbeat and show the employees they are energized to make the changes happen. There are always some risks when changes are being initiated. The manager needs to be ready for the potential negative effects of any changes and have a plan to handle them. If mistakes occur along the way, then this is the opportunity for the manager and their employees to learn from the mistakes and move forward. Organizations that have a talented and effective manager will be able to handle the changes that need to occur to keep them competitive in their industry.

JetEx -The Essential Service Solution Comments Off on JetEx -The Essential Service Solution 821

If you run a business or an organization, you understand how difficult it is to make sure that all of your bases are covered. Often, company owners must make tough decisions based on the resources they have available to them. This is often the case when comes to building, optimizing, warehousing, delivery, inventory management, packing, distributing etc.

Jet Ex Cargo

Why try to do it all yourself when you can get a professional business to come in and help you with exactly what you need?

Ishara - L
Mr. Ishara Adhikaramge Managing Director

Whether due to budget constraints or a false sense of security, many companies think they can afford or don’t need support. However, this is not the case. Every business will run in to issues at some point in time, and it is important to have experts there to help you ease in the process. Most businesses are great at doing their job, whatever product or service that may be, but many are not equipped to handle all the needs required in the rapidly advancing world. Instead of recruiting and hiring full-time experts to work in-house, many companies now have the option to turn to procurement solutions for convenience and efficiency.

That’s where managed service providers like JetExcome in. With a mission to be the most favored fulfillment service provider in Sri Lanka, by delivering world-class service to its clients, and to be a market leader by providing integrated supply chain solutions with a focus on achieving customer success, JetEx has come forward as the professional business solution.

Mr. Srimal Wickremasinghe - Chairman
Mr. Srimal Wickremasinghe – Chairman

The company started their operations on 1st September 2016, with a group of like-minded professionals who looked to provide services that other companies in the industry simply wouldn’t.

One of the most appealing aspects of JetEx is their cost-effectiveness. They will outline and define the specific set of services they will handle before you agree to anything. This allows businesses to plan and budget around their expenses as opposed to paying-as-you-go, leaving you open to volatile unpredictability.

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By: Savannah Audrey