Different Models of Developmental State 0 391

Development-Stage

To put it bluntly, there isn’t one economic theory that can single-handedly explain Singapore’s success; its economy combines extreme features of capitalism and socialism. All theories are partial; reality is complex

Development-Stage

Prof. Ha-Joon Chang

  • Former Consultant – (UNCTAD, WIDER, UNDP, UNIDO, UNRISD, INTECH, FAO, and ILO),
  • Former Consultant – The World Bank, the European Investment Bank, the Asian Development Bank.
  • Former Consultant for the Governments of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Ecuador, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Namibia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, UK, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Vietnam.
  • Winner of the 2003 Myrdal Prize.
  • Winner (jointly with Richard Nelson of ColumbiaUniversity) of the 2005 Leontief Prize for Advancing theFrontiers of EconomicThought awarded by Tufts University.
  • Winners of the Prize include the Nobel Laureates Amartya Sen and Daniel Kahnemann as well as John Kenneth Galbraith and Albert Hirschman.
  • He was ranked no. 9 in the Prospect magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

The ‘classic’ developmental state is an ideal type derived from the East Asian – more specifically Japanese – experience between the 1950s and the 1980s. 

There were of course variations even within East Asia. Korea actually went further down the road than Japan did, although now it has moved to the opposite extreme, embracing neo-liberalism as if there is no tomorrow. Between the 1960s and the 1980s, the Korean state pursued some of the most market-defying selective industrial policies, using an extremely powerful pilot agency (the Economic Planning Board, or the EPB) and total state ownership of the banking sector, both of which were missing in Japan. The Taiwanese state may have intervened in the affairs of the private sector less forcefully and dramatically than Japan or Korea did, but that was in part because there were few no large private sector firms in whose affairs the state felt the need to intervene. The other side of the coin of the weakness of the private sector in Taiwan was that SOEs (especially in upstream intermediate inputs industries, where scale economy is crucial) and state-financed R&D played a more important role in Taiwan than in Korea or Japan. Singapore used yet another model, combining free trade, a welcoming (albeit carefully targeted) approach to foreign direct investment, and a massive SOE sector (one of the biggest in the non-oil-producing world, producing 22% of GDP, when the world average is 9-10%). 

Even the ‘classic’ developmental state was, however, not confined to East Asia. During the same period, under a similar political condition of nationalistic, interventionist rightwing hegemony, France used a very similar strategy of economic development, involving (indicative) planning by Commissariat Général du Plan (the planning commission), sectoral industrial policy (of course, somewhat constrained by the imperatives of European integration) led by elite bureaucrats, and aggressive use of SOEs (Cohen, 1977, Hall, 1986, Hayward, 1986, and Chang, 1994). There is even anecdotal evidence that Japanese bureaucrats stationed in France were reporting on French policy practice.

If we broaden our definition of the developmental state to include any state that deliberately intervenes to promote development, we could argue that the Scandinavian countries also practiced a variety of developmentalism, especially since the 1950s. 

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Biznomics Note Pad 0 461

By Biznomics Research Team

Market Embraces Sri Lanka Sovereign Bond Issue

Sri Lanka raised USD 2.0 billion international sovereign bonds on the strength that IMF has endorsed the country’s economic performance, while the bonds having been rated by international rating agencies as “Non-Investment” grade. In fact Moodys attached “B2” rating while Standard and Poor’s and Fitch assigned “B” rating. The USD 500 million face value bond with 5-year maturity was raised at a semi-annual coupon rate of 6.35 percent while USD 1,500 million with 10-year maturity was raised with a semi-annual coupon rate of 7.55 percent. The Bonds were subscribed by 91 percent fund managers while 5 percent came from insurance and pension funds.

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Sri Lanka entered in to the international bond market in 2007 and the June 2019 issue was the 14th USD benchmark offering. This was also the country’s second sovereign bond transaction this year. The Government of Si Lanka raised USD 1 billion 5-year bond at a semi-annual coupon rate of 6.85 percent and a 10-year bond at a semi-annual coupon rate of 7.85 percent in March 2019.

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Sri Lanka has USD 17 billion ISBs as of June 2019 and account for nearly 50 percent of Government external debt.

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BIZnomics Note Pad 0 380

China and India – the second and seventh largest economies in the world (two largest economies in Asia) – are slowing down in 2019. The GDP growth rate in China is expected to be 6.2 percent, down from 6.7 percent in 2018 – the weakest in 3 decades. The GDP growth rate of India is projected at 6.7 percent, down from 7.0 percent in 2018. Chinese policy makers are saddled with trade talks with the US government to remove the recently imposed two way high tariff while Indian policy reforms take a backseat in the backdrop of impending National Elections in June 2019.

British Prime Minister Theresa May suffered a setback as parliament voted against her BREXIT proposal. The loss throws more uncertainty on UK’s plan to leave the EU on March 29. The European Central Bank down grading its economic forecast for the Euro Zone for 2019 and 2020 due to persistent uncertainties and risks in the region, expect inflationary pressures to rise slowly as capacity diminishes.

The World Bank sees darkening prospects for global growth that will slow to 2.9 percent in 2019 in the backdrop of moderating international trade and investment, elevated trade tensions and tightening financial conditions. The World Bank observed that debt vulnerability in low income countries are rising. Debt to GDP ratio for low income countries have climbed and the composition of debt has shifted toward more expensive market based financing. The Bank suggests that these economies should focus on mobilizing domestic resources, strengthening debt and investment management practices, and building resilient macro fiscal frameworks.

Sri Lanka’s official reserves declined to USD 6,142 million by end of January 2019 from USD 6,919 million reported at the end of December 2018. Short term (within 01 year) liabilities on foreign currency assets remain at USD 6,547 million placing net reserve on a negative terrain. Selling rates of major currencies remained under pressure with import demand picking up in mid-February. The selling rate of the US dollar declined from Rs.180.28 on 15th February 2019 to Rs.177.59 a week ago.

US – China trade talks aimed at ending the use of new two way tariff continue in Washington following a no deal in the talks in Beijing during the second week of February. The US President has indicated that the March 01st deadline could be extended for an agreement to be reached. China and US have imposed duties on more than USD 360 million in the two way trade which has shaken the global economy.

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) revealed that the GDP for South East Asia’s 5 major economies – Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand – has declined from 5.1 percent in 2017 to 4.8 percent in 2018. The ADB highlights that South East Asia with 650 million people and one of the world’s fastest growing regions, faces several headwinds such as escalating US – China trade tensions and weakening local currencies.

By: Econsult