Different Models of Developmental State 0 580

Development-Stage

To put it bluntly, there isn’t one economic theory that can single-handedly explain Singapore’s success; its economy combines extreme features of capitalism and socialism. All theories are partial; reality is complex

Development-Stage

Prof. Ha-Joon Chang

  • Former Consultant – (UNCTAD, WIDER, UNDP, UNIDO, UNRISD, INTECH, FAO, and ILO),
  • Former Consultant – The World Bank, the European Investment Bank, the Asian Development Bank.
  • Former Consultant for the Governments of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Ecuador, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Namibia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, UK, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Vietnam.
  • Winner of the 2003 Myrdal Prize.
  • Winner (jointly with Richard Nelson of ColumbiaUniversity) of the 2005 Leontief Prize for Advancing theFrontiers of EconomicThought awarded by Tufts University.
  • Winners of the Prize include the Nobel Laureates Amartya Sen and Daniel Kahnemann as well as John Kenneth Galbraith and Albert Hirschman.
  • He was ranked no. 9 in the Prospect magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

The ‘classic’ developmental state is an ideal type derived from the East Asian – more specifically Japanese – experience between the 1950s and the 1980s. 

There were of course variations even within East Asia. Korea actually went further down the road than Japan did, although now it has moved to the opposite extreme, embracing neo-liberalism as if there is no tomorrow. Between the 1960s and the 1980s, the Korean state pursued some of the most market-defying selective industrial policies, using an extremely powerful pilot agency (the Economic Planning Board, or the EPB) and total state ownership of the banking sector, both of which were missing in Japan. The Taiwanese state may have intervened in the affairs of the private sector less forcefully and dramatically than Japan or Korea did, but that was in part because there were few no large private sector firms in whose affairs the state felt the need to intervene. The other side of the coin of the weakness of the private sector in Taiwan was that SOEs (especially in upstream intermediate inputs industries, where scale economy is crucial) and state-financed R&D played a more important role in Taiwan than in Korea or Japan. Singapore used yet another model, combining free trade, a welcoming (albeit carefully targeted) approach to foreign direct investment, and a massive SOE sector (one of the biggest in the non-oil-producing world, producing 22% of GDP, when the world average is 9-10%). 

Even the ‘classic’ developmental state was, however, not confined to East Asia. During the same period, under a similar political condition of nationalistic, interventionist rightwing hegemony, France used a very similar strategy of economic development, involving (indicative) planning by Commissariat Général du Plan (the planning commission), sectoral industrial policy (of course, somewhat constrained by the imperatives of European integration) led by elite bureaucrats, and aggressive use of SOEs (Cohen, 1977, Hall, 1986, Hayward, 1986, and Chang, 1994). There is even anecdotal evidence that Japanese bureaucrats stationed in France were reporting on French policy practice.

If we broaden our definition of the developmental state to include any state that deliberately intervenes to promote development, we could argue that the Scandinavian countries also practiced a variety of developmentalism, especially since the 1950s. 

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The Price We Pay For Not Understanding The ‘Price’ 0 798

In the book titled ‘Marx’s ‘Theory of price and its Modern Rivals’, Sri Lankan born and educated Prof. Howard Nicholas exposes the flaws in the many theoretical debates in money, price and inflation. This he does by revealing the inconsistencies and contradictions in economic theories submitted to explain price. This is nothing new in Sri Lanka and many developed countries attributable to the fact the certain economists, due to a false understanding, are misled on what price is all about. Therefore, let us examine this false interpretation and try to understand the real parts that from PRICE which we play in commerce.

According to Prof. Nicholas, Orthodox economists starting with David Ricardo have not quite understood the concept of ‘price’ and how it is computed. He argues that the explanation of price by Marx, who had a deep understanding of the capitalist system, is more logical and clear. To understand Price we have to first understand how commodities bearing a price tag are produced and marketed. Prof. Nicholas who refers to this process as the- Production Cycle’ explains that present day economists go astray since at the outset they focus only on the process of exchange, assuming individuals are naturally endowed with commodities. This mistake causes them to ignore cost of production and focus on individuals and their choices when explaining prices.

A second important point made by Prof. Nicholas in his book is that when explaining price, from the outset we need to bring money into the picture. This is, to explain prices as money- prices. When products calculate the values of their commodities, they do so in terms of money thereby setting money prices. Buyers of goods in markets make payment in accordance with these money- prices. According to economic orthodoxy, the prices that matters are relative prices. That is, the price of one product in terms of another and not in terms of money. In fact, although this may not be so apparent when reading standard economics text books, money has no role to play in the basic explanation of prices. It only makes its appearance when macro-economic phenomena, in particular the aggregate level of prices are considered.

The third major argument prof. Nicholas advances is that the basis for explanation of cost of production of the commodity as its money cost of production, needs to be seen as the labour time spent in production. This is what Marx referred to as the value of commodity. Labour time spent in production amounts to money costs, when money represents labour time by itself. This happens when money is used by producers, to depict the value of the product. The importance of explaining prices is perhaps best been by producers, to depict the value of the product. The importance of explaining prices is perhaps best seen by the present downward pressure on global prices, resulting from the massive technological change across the globe. Despite unprecedented levels of printing of currency by Central Bank of major countries, world inflation rate has continued to fall down. This underlines the importance of labour productivity in explaining price, and the incorrect explanation of money and price by economists. It may also be the clearest practical support for Marx’s price theory as seen by Prf. Nicholas

By : Dr Kenneth De Zilwa

Global non – inclusive growth; Extract from article by Christean Lagarde 0 534

IMF Chief Christean Lagarde in her message in the IMF Annual Report 2018 says that countries should promote an open and rule basis multilateral trading system, and should strive to make new technologies work for all – boosting rather than undermining inclusive growth and financial stability.

According to her, the growth momentum of the global economy is under pressure from a slow erosion / weakening of trust in institution due to, a) the lingering effects of the global financial crisis. b) perception that the rewards of economic growth and globalization are not being shared fairly and equitably. c) anxiety over future of jobs and economic opportunity. d) weak governance frameworks that often facilitate corruption. She further emphasizes that population ageing and over-funding of pension schemes are holding back economic momentum. Income disparities are widening and if unaddressed the climate change is likely to severely disrupt economic wellbeing in the decades ahead.

Lagarde urged that European Union (EU) leaders need to redouble their efforts to lift living standards across the continent as populist movements question the merits of integration. The poorer southern countries in the EU have not caught up with their richer northern peers – a gap that has worsened since the global financial crisis. Between 2008 and 2017, the average annual growth in real income per person, was negative in the five southern members of the euro zone, hit hardest by the crisis.

She urged EU countries to reform their labor markets so that firms have greater flexibility in hiring and firing workers and their business climate becoming more welcoming to investment. These developments it is hoped, would increase spending on research and development.

Lagarde’s remarks come amid a turbulent debate over Britain’s exit from the EU, as well as amidst signs of spluttering growth in the world’s biggest economic bloc. The IMF partly blamed softening demand across Europe for having to cut its 2019 forecast for global growth, for the second time in three months.

South Asia to remain fastest growing region in world

The World Bank Global Economic Prospects Report released on 05th February 2019, expects South Asian regional growth to accelerate to 7.1 percent in 2019, under pinned by strengthening investment and robust consumption. India is forecast to grow by 7.3 percent as consumption remains robust and investment growth continues. Bangladesh is expected to grow by 7.0 percent supported by strong construction and infrastructure investments. Nepal growth forecast to moderate to 5.9 percent. Sri Lanka is anticipated to grow by 4.0 percent supported by domestic demand and infrastructure projects. Pakistan is projected to decelerate by 3.3 percent with financial conditions tightening.

By: Econsult