Aquafresh – “Bringing Nature to Life” The trendsetters and innovators of the bottled water industry in Sri Lanka 0 1241

Access Natural Water Pvt. Ltd. is the undisputed leader in the bottled water industry in Sri Lanka. Expanding their profile as the trendsetter in the industry, they are persistent in fulfilling their mission to provide sustainable innovative solutions from nature, for a healthier life. 

In May 2001, Access Natural Water Pvt. Ltd launched the Aquafresh five-gallonAqua-Fresh-Sri-Lanka bottles and in 2005, the company introduced the full range of PET bottles from 200ml to 5l. The unique design of the Aquafresh PET bottle revolutionized the Sri Lankan bottled water industry. 

Going with the trends, Access Natural Water Pvt. Ltd introduced Alkaline bottled drinking water and Flavoured bottled drinking water to the Sri Lankan market. Alkaline bottled drinking water is catered under the brand name of Alkafresh and has a pH value of 9+. Athletes and the fitness conscious prefer alkaline water for its unique health properties such as fast hydration and its ability to reduce the acidity of the body which causes illnesses. The pH chart ranges from 0-14 and within this scale, 1 refers to high acidity while 14 refers to the alkaline nature of a substance. With traces of magnesium and calcium bicarbonates, Alkafresh-pH9+ Alkaline water helps your body with balanced hydration.

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Go Nuts in Kajugama 0 1057

Cashew-in-Sri-Lanka

By: Savannah Audrey
As you drive along the Colombo-Kandy road passing Nittambuwa, a few kilometers away, lies a street display: Kajugama. From a distance, you will spot the vibrant colors of the clothes of the female sellers (Kaju girls as they are fondly called). Kajugama is known for its beautiful girls in traditional dresses of cloth and jacket and long hair who will greet you with vibrant smiles.

Cashew in Sri Lanka
It is said that the Portuguese sailors are the ones who introduced cashew to Sri Lanka. Cashew is something that no one can resist and is used in enhancing the flavor of various dishes. Kaju curry, a delicacy in Sri Lankan cuisine, is a must at most functions held in the country which serves rice and curry. It is not only tasty but is also loaded with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.  Cashew cultivation involves a lot of risks. The shelling process is laborious and time consuming.

The cashew season in Sri Lanka begins in March and continues through April. Vendors in Kajugama get their nuts from Wariyapola, Wanathavillu, Wewagama, Giriulla, Kalpitiya, Puttalam, Ampara, Mahiyangana, Galgamuwa, Galewela, and villages in the Eastern Province.  The global cashew economy is booming and Sri Lanka has to compete with some of the largest cashew exporters in the world including Africa, Brazil, Vietnam, and neighboring India.
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Circular Economies: Is Sri Lanka’s Waste Crisis a Wasted Opportunity 0 476

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Sri Lanka is currently in the midst of a waste crisis with landfills running out of space and the costs of disposal spiralling rapidly. A recent report by the WWF named Sri Lanka as the fifth largest contributor to marine plastic pollution and the level of recycling in Sri Lanka in particular for plastics falls well below global averages.

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The Sri Lankan economy on the other hand, continues to suffer from a significant balance of trade deficit and a weakening rupee in part due to imports for raw materials such as plastics, aluminium, paper/cardboard and electronics. Finding a way to increase the domestic ability to sort and recycle these materials for re-use in a circular way may in fact provide a solution for both the environment and the economy.

Circular-Economies-Is-Sri-Lanka’s-Waste-Crisis-a-Wasted-Opportunity

 

A linear economy, which typifies most products and materials here in Sri Lanka, is one whereby products are manufactured, used and then disposed of as waste. A circular economy by contrast, is one that aims to eliminate waste through the continual use of resources by reusing, repairing, refurbishing, remanufacturing and recycling raw materials and products at the end of their usable lives. This therefore closes the loop on the manufacturing process thereby reducing the need for new materials.

 

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The waste problem is not just limited to the Sri Lankan economy as materials such as plastics do not biodegrade and therefore will continue to exist until a solution is found. Plastic breaks down into what is known as microplastics after some time which significantly harms the environment as animals ingest this and toxins from the material itself seep into the water table. Recent studies suggest that we are ingesting the equivalent of one credit card every week. The health impacts of the plastic epidemic are likely to grow significantly.

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